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    Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:

     
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    Understand ordering and absolute value of rational numbers.

    Understand the absolute value of a rational number as its distance from 0 on the number line; interpret absolute value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity in a real-world situation. For example, for an account balance of –30 dollars, write |–30| = 30 to describe the size of the debt in dollars.

     
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    Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.

     
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    Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. Understand the following as special cases:  

    a. 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones — called a “ten.”
    b. The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven,
    eight, or nine ones.
    c. The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven,
    eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

     
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    Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 x 70 = 10 by applying concepts of place value and division.

    Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.

     
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    Use place value understanding to round decimals to any place.

     
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    Understand ordering and absolute value of rational numbers.

    Understand the absolute value of a rational number as its distance from 0 on the number line; interpret absolute value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity in a real-world situation. For example, for an account balance of –30 dollars, write |–30| = 30 to describe the size of the debt in dollars.

    Find the conjugate of a complex number; use the conjugate to find the absolute value (modulus) and quotient of complex numbers.

     
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    Interpret the parameters in a linear (f(x) = mx + b) and exponential (f(x) = a•dx) function in terms of context. (In the functions above, “m” and “b” are the parameters of the linear function, and “a” and “d” are the parameters of the exponential function.) In context, students should describe what these parameters mean in terms of change and starting value.

     
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    For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal description of the relationship. Key features include: intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; end behavior; and periodicity.

     
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    Write a function that describes a relationship between two quantities.

    Create equations in two or more variables to represent relationships between quantities; graph equations on coordinate axes with labels and scales.  Use function notation, evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context.